Export Opportunities for

Export opportunities

It is important for women-owned businesses and firms to be able to export their products. Why? Studies have found that women-owned firms that export not only earn more, but also employ more people and are, on average, more productive than women-owned firms that do not. In addition, women-owned businesses that export their goods and services average $14.5 million in receipts, compared to just $117, 036 for women-owned businesses that do not export. Clearly, exporting has very real advantages.

In celebration of Women’s History Month, I met with some women business owners to learn about their businesses, and encourage them to take advantage of the groundbreaking trade agreements being brokered by the Obama Administration by exporting their products and services abroad. I spoke with Erin Andrew, Director of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Women’s Business Ownership; Margot Dorfman, President of the U.S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce; Karen Bland, President of the Organization for Women in Trade; and Rachel Carson, President of Helicopter Tech Inc. We engaged in a candid conversation about the growing number of women-owned businesses in America, and how we can help them unlock the opportunities and benefits of exporting.

Under President Obama, U.S. exports have increased by nearly 50 percent and are growing nearly three times faster than the economy as a whole. Nearly 300, 000 American companies export, 98 percent of which are small and medium size businesses, but exports from businesses owned by women are unfortunately under-represented. Approximately 30 percent of businesses are women-owned, but only 12 percent of businesses that export are owned by women. We must change that.

During our conversation, Karen Bland shared her five ‘know before you go’ tips for exporting, which included knowing your business, your market, your assets, your partners, and the rules. Rachel Carson shared her experience beginning to export her replacement aircraft parts, which she now exports to 23 countries around the world. In addition to raising her sales, Rachel noted that exporting allowed her to grow her staff and hire Americans in need of work to support her overseas activity. Hearing their stories and their triumphs reminded me why USTR and the Small Business Administration work so hard to help women-owned businesses engage in and benefit from trade.

In addition to partnering with SBA to encourage women-owned businesses to export, USTR has also utilized trade as a tool to promote women’s economic empowerment around the world. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) currently under negotiation with 12 countries in the Asia-Pacific includes—for the first time ever in a trade agreement—a development chapter that contains an article on women and economic growth. The article explicitly calls on the countries that are party to the agreement to consider undertaking cooperative activities aimed at enhancing the ability of women, including workers and business-owners, to fully access and benefit from the opportunities created by the TPP.

We know that most women-owned businesses are small and medium-sized (SMEs), which is why we are dedicated to reducing barriers that disproportionally impact SMEs. To inform our negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP), in order to obtain broad input from SMEs, the U.S. International Trade Commission, USTR, SBA, and the Department of Commerce worked together to convene 28 small business roundtables in cities around the United States. We also hosted a hearing in Washington, D.C., to gather input directly from small businesses about barriers to exporting to the European Union (EU).

Additionally, the United States and the EU have convened an ongoing series of Small and Medium Enterprise Workshops to engage small businesses on both sides of the Atlantic on ways to enhance their participation in transatlantic trade and strengthen U.S.-EU cooperation on issues of interest to SMEs. Through T-TIP we can help SMEs, farmers, and workers unlock opportunity by finding new European customers and export markets.

USTR also participates in the Administration’s efforts to improve the ability of women to participate in the global trading system through fora such as the African Women’s Entrepreneurship Program in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Women in the Economy work in the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, and our numerous Trade and Investment Framework Agreements with developing countries.

The OECD reports that creating greater economic opportunities for women—including connecting them to global markets—will help increase labor productivity, and higher levels of female employment will widen the base of taxpayers and contributors to social protection systems, which are increasingly coming under pressure due to population ageing. At the end of the day, we all win when we expand women’s economic participation.

For our part, USTR, the Small Business Administration, and the Department of Commerce have a number of tools available to help business owners start and expand their businesses, and to sell their products and services abroad. These resources can be found at and www.sba.gov/content/explore-exporting.

We welcome your suggestions, and look forward to engaging with you to discuss our goal of building stronger export opportunities for women-owned firms and small businesses. Please email us at

creative xpressions blogging from scratch blogging with students creativity takes courage creation regained meaning of creativity anastasia beverly hills self made eyeshadow palette review selfmade man creativity quiz the self made billionaire effect creative on call creation for toddlers creation festival past lineups lp hangers selfmade blog photographers near me creative without drugs blogging business plan blog barking 123 recall self made objects creation beyond the wizard's sleeve selfmade merril lutsky creativity videos creation video for kids self made training facility las vegas creation association but non lucratif creation science movement creative without nature spotify mallu nurse selfmade self made hand sanitizer creative under the sea costume idea creativity meaning and definition selfmade millennial cover letter selfmade object creative vs analytical creativity up meme people who are made self-aware, by acting in front of a mirror or tv camera, have been found to selfmade codility challenge creative over self made pizza blog journal creative ways to engage prospects selfmade takko chups blogging is dying out what percent of billionaires are self made icreative palm desert creativity at its best selfmade eastwood rowdy self made millionaire stories creation poem self made t shirts online blogging startup personal selfmade fuck films hidden through creative process selfmade site:pinterest.com creative update creation tattoo creativity netflix creation lamis smells like creativity among learners beyond creative fortnite difference between creative commons and copyright selfmade mouthrinse for gum desease creativity by john cleese creative after school activities creative without strategy is called art creativity during pregnancy creation date between sql query selfmade women selfmade entrepreneurs youtube creativepro week self made madam cj walker netflix creative commons creativity project selfmade address creative form taekwondo creative during pandemic creative learning creative gender reveal ideas self-made woman creative in my kitchen blogging classes near me blog mickey creative out of home advertising creation date between self made comic self made t shirt creative escapes black self made millionaires blog website builder blogging coach selfmade autowerks self made objects self made anastasia beverly hills palette self made success stories difference between blogging and content writing
Source: www.whitehouse.gov
RELATED VIDEO
Introduction to Export Market Development Grants
Introduction to Export Market Development Grants
Crude Oil Exports: Market Drivers and Near-Term Implications
Crude Oil Exports: Market Drivers and Near-Term Implications
Export Market Development: A Vital Partnership with U.S. Wheat
Export Market Development: A Vital Partnership with U.S. Wheat
RELATED FACTS
Share this Post

Related posts

Agricultural Programme

Agricultural Programme

JUNE 24, 2022

The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) is Africa’s policy framework for agricultural transformation…

Read More
Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa

Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa

JUNE 24, 2022

The Forum for Agricultural research in Africa (FARA) is an apex organization bringing together and forming coalitions of…

Read More